LET OUR DEDICATED CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEYS HELP YOU
Hildreth & Rueda
Free Consultations

Virtual Appointments

Se Habla Espanol

Putting Experienced Criminal Defense Representation On Your Side

  1. Home
  2.  → 
  3. Drug Crimes
  4.  → Meth facts and history

Meth facts and history

On Behalf of | Jan 20, 2023 | Drug Crimes |

Meth is a shortened name for methamphetamine, a highly addictive stimulant drug. Many people face criminal charges for possessing and selling meth and meth paraphernalia in Texas. While not a new drug, its use increased significantly in recent years because of its low cost and expanded availability. Additionally, the drug’s highly addictive nature furthered its use among persons with substance abuse issues.

Methamphetamine history

At one time, amphetamines were widely prescribed in the United States for many ailments . Labs produced methamphetamine as a stronger version of amphetamines. Eventually, the dangers associated with amphetamines and methamphetamines became known, leading to tighter government regulation. Meth ended up labeled as a schedule II drug, meaning the drug has medical use but comes with a high potential for misuse. Some pharmaceutical drugs contain meth and are legal with a prescription, however.

Street meth cooked in illegal labs is highly addictive and dangerous. Many users ingest a smokable form of crystal methamphetamine, and others opt to snort or inject the drug. Pill-form meth also exists. Persons using meth in these ways could become addicted and suffer significant adverse health reactions. Many turn to criminal behavior to support their habit.

Legal consequences

Anyone who faces drug charges of possessing methamphetamine may defend against the accusations by proving the drugs did not belong to them. Also, anyone arrested for drug possession must have direct or constructive possession. In other words, the drugs must be on their person or in a location under their control. Otherwise, the drug charges may be weak.

When significant evidence points to guilt, the accused may try to plea bargain to lesser charges or ask for leniency in sentencing. Plea deals might be preferable to lengthy prison sentences, which might be the case with possession with intent to distribute charges.